To Seek Refuge

“To Seek Refuge” is a visual narration by artist and designer Samer Fouad that aims to shine light on recent events concerning immigration and conflict in the Middle East. 

By using found objects and creating an immersive environment, the artist invites you to familiarize yourself with feelings that are not so familiar. Fouad uses images from Syrian architecture prior to the crisis and combines them with images of the destruction that followed. 

This work was later acquired by The United Nations sponsored show "GENERATION ز Art for Sustainable Futures" curated by Edge of Arabia and Razan al Sarraf. 

This exhibition, as part of the New York Arab Art & Education Initiative, explored Arab culture, politics and tradition as seen from the point of view of young artists using satire, humor and self-analysis. The show, located in a previously historic landmark nightclub, included artists from Kuwait, Egypt and Saudi Arabia, each with their own distinctive approaches, as they attempt to reclaim the image of “being Arab”. Whether through potent visuals, a subtle revealing of the beauty of tradition, or a candor towards the “now”, these artists act as archivers, witnesses and pioneers of a new era of change

The work "To Seek Refuge" shines a light on recent events concerning immigration and conflict in the Middle East. By using found objects and creating an immersive environment, the artist invites the viewer to familiarize him/herself with feelings that are not so familiar, using the aesthetics that resemble Syrian architecture prior to the civil war and combines them with the aesthetics of the destruction that followed. The GIF of the faceless woman speaks also of the loss of identity when a displaced civilian seeks refuge.

The words immigrant were written in Arabic and could only be viewed from the exterior of the piece, while the word refugee was written inside in Arabic. The word refugee could only be seen by the person standing in the work. This showed that this invisible border (the glass) created this terminology and the words didn't represent the people.